Been asked before what's the point in shooting with film when you have a perfectly good dslr and even iPhone, and it's one I've thought about myself.  Today's technology has packed cameras with so much out of the box functionality they allow the photographer to do so much more with them.  Even today's iPhone with simple focus and exposure locks and megapixels can capture some amazing images with relative ease.  All of that being said, there is a lot more that goes into capturing great images than just equipment.  

Canon AE1 Program

Canon AE1 Program

      So seriously, why are you still shooting film with all that 'fancy' equipment?  Like most hobbyist photographers there's an interest in the history and process of making images, and I'm sure most of us around my age started shooting with film, even if it was a 35mm point and shoot of family vacations.  There's a nostalgic tie to the past in all of us.  Remembering how we used to do things brings some relevance to where we are today.  

      Another reason to shoot with film, learning to slow down.  Not sure if it's a byproduct of today's cameras but there is a tendency to just shoot shoot shoot and fix it later in post, for me anyway.  I was noticing that instead of slowing down and trying to capture the best image I could, I was taking shots and previewing then adjusting settings to retake if needed.  I wasn't really learning or teaching myself how to produce better results, I was relying on the camera.  With film you learn real quick you are in charge of your results and  the camera is just a tool at your artistic mercy.  It was starting to feel the other way around.  

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    My favorite subject to shoot is the natural landscape of Oklahoma and the rich history embedded throughout this great state.  This means most of my hobbyist photography is spent with subjects that don't move and are outdoors in natural light.  A perfect combination for a newbie to film like me where I can slow down and setup, compose, and enjoy the process in making a photograph.  Part of that process is another reason I absolutely love working with film, the anticipation.  When I'm out exploring and my eye catches something my mind starts doing cartwheels all the way up until I fire the shutter, then at that moment I get that feeling.... man I hope that shot turns out.  One of those feelings that binds you to each image, a feeling for me that's hard to get with today's instant reminiscing. 

     Part of the emotion in film photography is development, something I'd still like to learn how to do but right now am at the mercy of labs.  The anticipation of waiting to pick up scans and see the results of what I shot brings back memories for me to the one hour photo days.  

    With all that being said I've still so much to learn and many more rolls to try out and experiment with.  And whether I ruin a completely good roll of film or nail every exposure I'm in love with the process of shooting film.   

    Here are some shots partly from a recent trip with my friend Thomas Perez and some just around town.  Thomas is a film enthusiast with a mean Pentax 67 Medium Format camera, the color shot of him is with his camera he let me use that day.  Gives me a bit of camera envy, the natural lens vignette and sharpness in that Pentax are so good.

      The Black and White images were taken with the Canon AE1 Program using Kodak T-MAX 100 B&W film and a 50mm 1.8 lens.  Thomas told me about this app called Analogger that is like a notepad and organizer to keep track of in camera settings. So I have been using that to record and help me slow down and learn from my shooting. It's helpful and definitely keeps me organized.

    Hope you enjoy the photos as much as had making them.

 

 

 

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Pentax 67

Pentax 67

waited and waited for a mountain biker to zip through the trail.

waited and waited for a mountain biker to zip through the trail.


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